Chedworth, Glos

The quiet village of Chedworth is situated in a wooded valley in the Cotswold Hills about 7 miles north of Cirencester. Many of the houses are built of the local stone, as is St Andrew’s church with its impressive south facade with a row of five Perpendicular windows. The late twelfth century church tower indicates that the village dates back at least to that period, whilst the famous Roman villa discovered nearby dates back to the second century.

Chedworth had not attracted our attention in our Pitman quest, until we looked in “The Bristol and Gloucestershire Lay Subsidy of 1523 – 1527″*. There was no record of a Pitman in any of our target towns and villages, but Richard Pytman in Chedworth caught our eye. Wealthy enough to be paying tax, close to our core area, with a first name that hinted at a link, we suspect he might be the ancestor of the Pitmans we found in Stow from the mid-1500s, but we haven’t found any evidence to support this theory. The surname apparently soon died out in Chedworth, but the lack of sixteenth century parish records makes it difficult to determine exactly when.

Chedworth church in winter

Chedworth church in winter

*   “The Bristol and Gloucestershire Lay Subsidy of 1523 – 1527” editor M A Faraday,
      published by The Bristol & Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, 2009